1. Who is ACUS?

    Who is ACUS? ACUS brings together people from government, academia, civil society groups, and the private sector who care about improving administrative processes.

ACUS is a unique federal agency because of its make-up. Very few of the people who do its work are full-time, paid ACUS employees. ACUS is:

The Chairman. The Chairman is appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, for 5 years. The Chairman manages and directs ACUS’s activities and chairs the two annual plenary sessions.

Read about the current Chairman and former Chairs.

The Council. The Council is 10 people appointed by the President for 3 years. Half the Council are senior officials of other federal agencies. The other half are prominent scholars, former government officials, regulatory lawyers, or others from outside the federal government. The Council approves the topics ACUS studies, gets the draft recommendations and reports from the six ACUS committees, sets the agenda for the plenary sessions, approves ACUS’s budget, and approves the choice of Public Members.

See the list of current Council Members.

Government Members. The government members of the Conference are senior officials of other federal agencies. There are typically 60 government members, chosen by their agencies. They have no set term and participate in ACUS in addition to their full-time work at their own agencies.

See the list of current Government Members.

Public Members. The public members of the Conference come primarily from academia, law firms, and public interest organizations. They have experience and expertise in administrative law, public administration, or other areas that help in ACUS’s work. There are typically 40 public members appointed by the Chairman with the Council’s approval. They serve for 2 years and can be reappointed for up to 6 consecutive years.

See the list of current Public Members.

Three other groups of people participate in the work of ACUS, except that they can’t vote on adoption of recommendations in the plenary sessions:

Senior Fellows include former Chairs and people who were government or public members for at least 6 years. They are appointed by the Chairman for 2 years and can be reappointed.

See the list of current Senior Fellows.

Liaison Representatives are officials from agencies that don't send a Government Member to ACUS. They are chosen by their agencies. They are appointed by the Chairman for 2 years and can be reappointed.

See the list of current Liaison Representatives.

Special Counsels are people with special expertise who help the work of the members. They are appointed by the Chairman for 2 years and can be reappointed.

See the list of current Special Counsels.

The Staff. A small full-time staff does research, organizes workshops and other events, answers questions from Members and the public, and helps the Conference committees create recommendations and work for their implementation. Senior staff include the Executive Director, the Research Director and the General Counsel.

See the list of current Staff.

The Guide for Conference Members contains more details about the groups who make up ACUS and do its work.